Association between periodontitis and severity of COVID-19 infection: A case–control study

Uncategorized Oct 27, 2021

This research was originally published in 2021 by Nadya Marouf,Wenji Cai,Khalid N. Said,Hanin Daas,Hanan Diab,Venkateswara Rao Chinta,Ali Ait Hssain,Belinda Nicolau,Mariano Sanz,Faleh Tamimi.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT:

Aim

COVID-19 is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response that can result in fatal outcomes. Systemic inflammation is also a main characteristic of periodontitis. Therefore, we investigated the association of periodontitis with COVID-19 complications.

Materials and Methods

A case–control study was performed using the national electronic health records of the State of Qatar between February and July 2020. Cases were defined as patients who suffered COVID-19 complications (death, ICU admissions or assisted ventilation), and controls were COVID-19 patients discharged without major complications. Periodontal conditions were assessed using dental radiographs from the same database. Associations...

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The Oral Microbiome in Periodontal Health

Uncategorized Oct 14, 2021

This research was originally published in 2021 by Magdalena LenartovaBarbora TesinskaTatjana JanatovaOndrej HrebicekJaroslav MysakJiri Janata and Lucie Najmanova

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT:

The estimation of oral microbiome (OM) taxonomic composition in periodontally healthy individuals can often be biased because the clinically periodontally healthy subjects for evaluation can already experience dysbiosis. Usually, they are included just based on the absence of clinical signs of periodontitis. Additionally, the age of subjects is used to be higher to correspond well with tested groups of patients with chronic periodontitis, a disorder typically associated with aging. However, the dysbiosis of the OM precedes the clinical signs of the disease by many months or even years. The absence of periodontal pockets thus does not necessarily mean also good periodontal health and the obtained...

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Progress in Oral Microbiome Related to Oral and Systemic Diseases: An Update

Uncategorized Oct 14, 2021

This research was originally published in 2021 by Yeon-Hee Lee, Sang Wan Chung, Q-Schick Auh, Seung-Jae Hong, Yeon-Ah Lee, Junho Jung, Gi-Ja Lee, Hae Jeong Park, Seung-Il Shin and Ji-Youn Hong 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT:

The human oral microbiome refers to an ecological community of symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms found in the oral cavity. The oral cavity is an environment that provides various biological niches, such as the teeth, tongue, and oral mucosa. The oral cavity is the gateway between the external environment and the human body, maintaining oral homeostasis, protecting the mouth, and preventing disease.

On the flip side, the oral microbiome also plays an important role in the triggering, development, and progression of oral and systemic diseases. In recent years, disease diagnosis through the analysis of the human oral microbiome has been realized with the recent development of innovative detection...

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Amoeba linked to severe gum disease

Uncategorized Sep 30, 2021

This research was originally published in 2021 by the editor of the Bite Magazine

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT:

For the first time, researchers from Germany have shown that a unicellular parasite commonly found in the mouth plays a role in both severe tissue inflammation and tissue destruction. 

The team from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin—and whose findings are published in the Journal of Dental Researchfound that most patients with severe and recurrent periodontitis (gum disease) showed an increased presence of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis inside their oral cavities. Once the parasite has invaded the gingival tissue, it feeds on its cells and causes tissue destruction. 

Read Full Article Here

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The Oral Microbiome in Periodontal Health

Uncategorized Sep 27, 2021

This research was originally published in 2021 by Magdalena Lenartova, Barbora Tesinska, Tatjana Janatova, Ondrej Hrebicek Jaroslav Mysak , Jiri Janata and Lucie Najmanova

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

The estimation of oral microbiome (OM) taxonomic composition in periodontally healthy individuals can often be biased because the clinically periodontally healthy subjects for evaluation can already experience dysbiosis. Usually, they are included just based on the absence of clinical signs of periodontitis. Additionally, the age of subjects is used to be higher to correspond well with tested groups of patients with chronic periodontitis, a disorder typically associated with aging. However, the dysbiosis of the OM precedes the clinical signs of the disease by many months or even years. The absence of periodontal pockets thus does not necessarily mean also good periodontal health and the obtained image of...

Continue Reading...

Progress in Oral Microbiome Related to Oral and Systemic Diseases: An Update

Uncategorized Sep 27, 2021

This research was originally published in 2021 by Yeon-Hee Lee , Sang Wan Chung , Q-Schick Auh , Seung-Jae Hong , Yeon-Ah Lee , Junho Jung , Gi-Ja Lee, Hae Jeong Park  , Seung-Il Shin  and Ji-Youn Hong 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

The human oral microbiome refers to an ecological community of symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms found in the oral cavity. The oral cavity is an environment that provides various biological niches, such as the teeth, tongue, and oral mucosa. The oral cavity is the gateway between the external environment and the human body, maintaining oral homeostasis, protecting the mouth, and preventing disease. On the flip side, the oral microbiome also plays an important role in the triggering, development, and progression of oral and systemic diseases. In recent years, disease diagnosis through the analysis of the human oral microbiome has been realized with the recent development of...

Continue Reading...

Chronic disease management and care coordination: Expanding the dental provider’s role

Uncategorized Jul 31, 2021

This research was originally published in 2021 by Alicia Webb, MSHI, BTDH, RDH and Shannon Sommers, MSHI, BTDH, RDH.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

 

As of 2018, approximately one-half of adult patients in the United States have at least one of 10 common chronic diseases.1 The COVID-19 pandemic has proven that more patients have multiple chronic conditions and require infection-related treatment, while at the same time fewer patients are seeking preventive care.2 Subsequently, it is estimated there will be a shortage of up to 35,600 primary care providers by 2025.1

Considering that dental practitioners are formally educated in the biomedical sciences, and that approximately 9% of patients visit a dentist but not a physician,1 dental providers are well positioned to examine the role that chronic diseases play in oral health outcomes and could be the answer to addressing these issues.3 Currently,...

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Certain oral microbiota linked to pancreatic cancer, study finds

This research was originally published in 2019 by Cheryl Xia.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

A large case-controlled study shows the association between human oral microbiota and pancreatic cancer risk.

Pancreatic cancer is the 12th most commonly occurring cancer worldwide and the 7th leading cause of cancer-related death. Due to its high lethality, the five-year survival rate is estimated to be 24% at early diagnosis and 1.8% by advanced-stage diagnosis. Prevention strategies for pancreatic cancer are imperative, however, the etiology of this disease is poorly understood. Cigarette smoking is one of the few established risk factors that has been linked to cancer development. Other modifiable exposures include obesity, diabetes, and chronic pancreatitis that are often seen in pancreatic cancer patients. Of interest, recent research has associated periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, with increased pancreatic...

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Does periodontal disease drive pancreatic cancer?

This research was originally published in 2019 by Ana Sandoiu. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Is it possible that prevention of periodontal disease might be key to the prevention of pancreatic cancer? While intervention studies on humans to prove that theory have yet to be conducted, there is robust data that seems to implicate specific periodontal pathogens raising the risk for, and most likely contributing to, the development of pancreatic cancer. This is something dental professionals need to know—read more here.


If this question intrigues you, keep reading. It is a topic I keep stumbling across in my quest for current data on oral-systemic connections. It is also personal, as my husband is a 10-year pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer survivor. A recent article I read was compelling enough that I thought, “Wow! Clinicians really need to understand this.” Check out the title: “Periodontal pathogens...

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Candida infection can reach brain and impair memory

This research was originally published in 2019 by Ana Sandoiu.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

A new study in mice reveals that Candida albicans — a fungus largely perceived as harmless — can cause memory problems and brain abnormalities that resemble those characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease.

Candida albicansis a species of fungus that grows naturally in the human gut, mouth, and vagina.

Although the yeast is mostly harmless, it can develop into issues ranging from thrush to more serious infections that reach the blood and other organs.

C. albicans is the most common cause of fungal infections in humans, as well as the most extensively studied fungal pathogen that affects people.

new studyTrusted Source, which appears in the journal Nature Communications, adds to the existing body of knowledge about C. albicans.

The new research shows that the fungus can enter the...

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