A MYSTERIOUS BACTERIUM MAY BE A CRITICAL PART OF CANCER : COULD WE TREAT SOME CANCERS WITH A SIMPLE ANTIBIOTIC?

This research was originally published in 2017 by DOM GALEON. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

The Case of the Traveling Bacteria

In 2011, two researchers stumbled upon an intriguing find. In separate studies, Dr. Matthew Meyerson from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Dr. Robert A. Holt from the Simon Fraser University in British Columbia found bacteria that’s normally in the mouth, called Fusobacteria, in human colon cancers.

Six years later, in a new study published in the journal Science, Meyerson and colleagues have confirmed the presence of Fusobacteria in up to half of all colon tumors. The researchers extensively studied human colon tumors that have metastasized to the liver. They found that tumors that have been infected with Fusobacteria continued to be so, even in the liver.

On the other hand, those cancer cells that originally didn’t have the bacteria remained uninfected, and tumor cells that grew from the liver and not the colon were also untouched. As further demonstration, Meyerson’s team transplanted human colon cancer cells in four generations of mice. In each generation, there were Fusobacteria inhabiting the tumor cells.

The suggestion of a role for bacteria in cancer has excited and intrigued scientists.

“By far the most likely explanation is that the cancer metastasizes to the liver and carries this microbiome with it,” Meyerson told the New York Times, suggesting that Fusobacteria traveled with the colon cancer cells upon metastasis. “The bacteria are not there by chance. It’s kind of amazing that the bacteria are such an integral part of the cancer.”



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