Porphyromonas gingivalis Strain Specific Interactions with Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells: A Comparative Study

This research was originally published in 2012 by Paulo H. Rodrigues, Leticia Reyes , Amandeep S. Chadda, Myriam Bélanger , Shannon M. Wallet, Debra Akin, William Dunn, Jr, and Ann Progulske-Fox. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

 

Both epidemiologic and experimental findings suggest that infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis exacerbates progression of atherosclerosis. As P. gingivalis exhibits significant strain variation, it is reasonable that different strains possess different capabilities and/or mechanisms by which they promote atherosclerosis. Using P. gingivalis strains that have been previously evaluated in the ApoE null atherosclerosis model, we assessed the ability of W83, A7436, 381, and 33277 to adhere, invade, and persist in human coronary artery endothelial (HCAE) cells. W83 and 381 displayed an equivalent ability to adhere to HCAE cells, which was...

Continue Reading...

Prevalence of periodontal pathogens in coronary atherosclerotic plaque of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

This research was originally published in 2009 by Jaideep Mahendra, Little Mahendra, V. M. Kurian, K. Jaishankar, and R. Mythilli. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Background

Chronic bacterial infections have been associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The ability of oral pathogens to colonize in coronary atheromatous plaque is well known. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of four common periodontal pathogens in coronary plaques. We detected the presence of 16S rRNA of Treponema denticola, Eikenella Corrodens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Campylobacter rectus in subgingival and atherosclerotic plaques of CABG surgery by using Polymerase Chain Reaction.

Methods

51 patients in the age group of 40 to 80 years with chronic periodontitis were recruited for the study. These patients were suffering from Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and underwent...

Continue Reading...

Periodontal disease with treatment reduces subsequent cancer risks

This research was originally published in 2014 by Ing-Ming Hwang , Li-Min Sun , Cheng-Li Lin , Chun-Feng Lee , Chia-Hung Kao. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol. 


ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between routine treatment of periodontal disease (PD) and the subsequent risks for cancers in Taiwan.

Methods: Study participants were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI) system database. The PD with a routine treatment cohort contained 38 902 patients. For each treatment cohort participant, two age- and sex-matched comparison (control) cohort participants were randomly selected. Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the effects of PD with treatment on the subsequent risk of cancer.

Results: The overall risk of developing cancer was significantly lower in the treatment cohort than in the patients without treatment (adjusted Hazard ratio =...

Continue Reading...

Is Periodontitis a Risk Factor for Cognitive Impairment and Dementia? A Case-Control Study

This research was originally published in 2015 by José A. Gil-Montoya, Ines Sanchez-Lara, Cristobal Carnero-Pardo, Francisco Fornieles, Juan Montes, Rosa Vilchez, J. S. Burgos, M. A. Gonzalez-Moles, Rocío Barrios, Manuel Bravo. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Background: Dementia is a multi-etiologic syndrome characterized by multiple cognitive deficits but not always by the presence of cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment is associated with multiple non-modifiable risk factors but few modifiable factors. Epidemiologic studies have shown an association between periodontitis, a potentially modifiable risk factor, and cognitive impairment. The objective of this study is to determine whether clinical periodontitis is associated with the diagnosis of cognitive impairment/dementia after controlling for known risk factors, including age, sex, and education level.

Methods: A case-control study was conducted...

Continue Reading...

Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer’s Disease

This research was originally published in 2016 by Mark Ide,Marina Harris,Annette Stevens,Rebecca Sussams,Viv Hopkins,David Culliford,James Fuller,Paul Ibbett,Rachel Raybould,Rhodri Thomas,Ursula Puenter,Jessica Teeling,V. Hugh Perry,Clive Holmes. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer’s disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer’s disease is...

Continue Reading...

Relationship Among Mothers’ Glycemic Level, Periodontitis, and Birth Weight

This research was originally published in 2016 by Isaac S. Gomes-Filho, Eliesita C. Pereira, Simone S. Cruz, Luis Fernando F. Adan, Maria Isabel P. Vianna, Johelle S. Passos-Soares, Soraya C. Trindade, Ernesto P. Oliveira, Michelle T. Oliveira, Eneida de M. M. Cerqueira, Antonio Luis Pereira, Maurício L. Barreto, Gregory John Seymour. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study is to determine the influence of glycemic level on the relationship between periodontitis and low birth weight (LBW).

Methods: A case-control study was conducted with 372 females divided into cases (109 mothers of newborns with birth weight <2,500 g) and controls (263 mothers of newborns with birth weight ≥2,500 g). The birth weight of children was obtained from medical records, whereas information on sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health characteristics of the participants was obtained through an...

Continue Reading...

Diabetes and periodontal disease

This research was originally published in 2012 by Rajkumar Daniel, Subramanium Gokulanathan, Natarajan Shanmugasundaram, Mahalingam Lakshmigandhan, Thangavelu Kavin. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease characterized by increased blood glucose levels and abnormalities of lipid metabolism due to absence or decreased level of insulin. It affects all the body organs and their functions either directly or indirectly. Every dentist should have a basic understanding of the etiopathogenesis, oral and systemic manifestations of this disease. The periodontal diseases are a consequence of extension of the gingival inflammation into the underlying supporting structures of the periodontium, initiated by the presence of plaque and its products on the surfaces of the teeth and the adjoining structures. The progression of periodontal disease is influenced by variety of factors like microorganisms, host...

Continue Reading...

What role do periodontal pathogens play in osteoarthritis and periprosthetic joint infections of the knee?

This research was originally published in 2014 by Garth D Ehrlich, Fen Z Hu, Nicholas Sotereanos, Jeffrey Sewicke, Javad Parvizi, Peter L Nara, Carla Renata Arciola. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-electron spray ionization (ESI)-time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS), we identified multiple periodontal pathogens within joint tissues of individuals undergoing replacement arthroplasties of the knee. The most prevalent of the periodontal pathogens were Treponema denticola and Enterococcus faecalis, the latter of which is commonly associated with apical periodontitis. These findings were unique to periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the knee and were never observed for PJIs of other lower extremity joints (hip and ankle) or upper extremity joints (shoulder and elbow). These data were confirmed by multiple independent methodologies including fluorescent in situ...

Continue Reading...

Porphyromonas gingivalis Facilitates the Development and Progression of Destructive Arthritis through Its Unique Bacterial Peptidylarginine Deiminase (PAD)

This research was originally published in 2013 by Katarzyna J. Maresz,Annelie Hellvard,Aneta Sroka,Karina Adamowicz,Ewa Bielecka,Joanna Koziel,Katarzyna Gawron,Danuta Mizgalska,Katarzyna A. Marcinska,Malgorzata Benedyk,Krzysztof Pyrc,Anne-Marie Quirke,Roland Jonsson,Saba Alzabin,Patrick J. Venables,Ky-Anh Nguyen,Piotr Mydel ,Jan Potempa. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

 

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis are two prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases in humans and are associated with each other both clinically and epidemiologically. Recent findings suggest a causative link between periodontal infection and rheumatoid arthritis via bacteria-dependent induction of a pathogenic autoimmune response to citrullinated epitopes. Here we showed that infection with viable periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83 exacerbated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in a mouse model, as manifested by earlier...

Continue Reading...

Association between periodontitis and mortality in stages 3–5 chronic kidney disease: NHANES III and linked mortality study

This research was originally published in 2015 by Praveen Sharma, Thomas Dietrich, Charles J. Ferro, Paul Cockwell, Iain L.C. Chapple. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

Abstract

Introduction

Periodontitis may add to the systemic inflammatory burden in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD), thereby contributing to an increased mortality rate. This study aimed to determine the association between periodontitis and mortality rate (all-cause and cardiovascular disease-related) in individuals with stage 3–5 CKD, hitherto referred to as “CKD”.

Methods

Survival analysis was carried out using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and linked mortality data. Cox proportional hazards regression was employed to assess the association between periodontitis and mortality, in individuals with CKD. This association was compared with the association between mortality and traditional risk...

Continue Reading...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Close

50% Complete

Two Step

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.