Diabetes and periodontal disease

This research was originally published in 2012 by Rajkumar Daniel, Subramanium Gokulanathan, Natarajan Shanmugasundaram, Mahalingam Lakshmigandhan, Thangavelu Kavin. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease characterized by increased blood glucose levels and abnormalities of lipid metabolism due to absence or decreased level of insulin. It affects all the body organs and their functions either directly or indirectly. Every dentist should have a basic understanding of the etiopathogenesis, oral and systemic manifestations of this disease. The periodontal diseases are a consequence of extension of the gingival inflammation into the underlying supporting structures of the periodontium, initiated by the presence of plaque and its products on the surfaces of the teeth and the adjoining structures. The progression of periodontal disease is influenced by variety of factors like microorganisms, host...

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What role do periodontal pathogens play in osteoarthritis and periprosthetic joint infections of the knee?

This research was originally published in 2014 by Garth D Ehrlich, Fen Z Hu, Nicholas Sotereanos, Jeffrey Sewicke, Javad Parvizi, Peter L Nara, Carla Renata Arciola. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-electron spray ionization (ESI)-time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS), we identified multiple periodontal pathogens within joint tissues of individuals undergoing replacement arthroplasties of the knee. The most prevalent of the periodontal pathogens were Treponema denticola and Enterococcus faecalis, the latter of which is commonly associated with apical periodontitis. These findings were unique to periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the knee and were never observed for PJIs of other lower extremity joints (hip and ankle) or upper extremity joints (shoulder and elbow). These data were confirmed by multiple independent methodologies including fluorescent in situ...

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Porphyromonas gingivalis Facilitates the Development and Progression of Destructive Arthritis through Its Unique Bacterial Peptidylarginine Deiminase (PAD)

This research was originally published in 2013 by Katarzyna J. Maresz,Annelie Hellvard,Aneta Sroka,Karina Adamowicz,Ewa Bielecka,Joanna Koziel,Katarzyna Gawron,Danuta Mizgalska,Katarzyna A. Marcinska,Malgorzata Benedyk,Krzysztof Pyrc,Anne-Marie Quirke,Roland Jonsson,Saba Alzabin,Patrick J. Venables,Ky-Anh Nguyen,Piotr Mydel ,Jan Potempa. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

 

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis are two prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases in humans and are associated with each other both clinically and epidemiologically. Recent findings suggest a causative link between periodontal infection and rheumatoid arthritis via bacteria-dependent induction of a pathogenic autoimmune response to citrullinated epitopes. Here we showed that infection with viable periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83 exacerbated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in a mouse model, as manifested by earlier...

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Association between periodontitis and mortality in stages 3–5 chronic kidney disease: NHANES III and linked mortality study

This research was originally published in 2015 by Praveen Sharma, Thomas Dietrich, Charles J. Ferro, Paul Cockwell, Iain L.C. Chapple. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

Abstract

Introduction

Periodontitis may add to the systemic inflammatory burden in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD), thereby contributing to an increased mortality rate. This study aimed to determine the association between periodontitis and mortality rate (all-cause and cardiovascular disease-related) in individuals with stage 3–5 CKD, hitherto referred to as “CKD”.

Methods

Survival analysis was carried out using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and linked mortality data. Cox proportional hazards regression was employed to assess the association between periodontitis and mortality, in individuals with CKD. This association was compared with the association between mortality and traditional risk...

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Presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in esophagus and its association with the clinicopathological characteristics and survival in patients with esophageal cancer

This research was originally published in 2016 byShegan Gao, Shuoguo Li, Zhikun Ma, Shuo Liang, Tanyou Shan, Mengxi Zhang, Xiaojuan Zhu, Pengfei Zhang, Gang Liu, Fuyou Zhou, Xiang Yuan, Ruinuo Jia, Jan Potempa, David A. Scott, Richard J. Lamont, Huizhi Wang & Xiaoshan Feng. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Background

Mounting evidence suggests a causal relationship between specific bacterial infections and the development of certain malignancies. However, the possible role of the keystone periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains unknown. Therefore, we examined the presence of P. gingivalis in esophageal mucosa, and the relationship between P. gingivalis infection and the diagnosis and prognosis of ESCC.

Methods

The presence of P. gingivalis in the esophageal tissues from ESCC patients and normal controls was examined by...

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Periodontal Disease and Breast Cancer: Prospective Cohort Study of Postmenopausal Women

This research was originally published in 2016 by Jo L. Freudenheim, Robert J. Genco, Michael J. LaMonte, Amy E. Millen, Kathleen M. Hovey, Xiaodan Mai, Ngozi Nwizu, Christopher A. Andrews and Jean Wactawski-Wende. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Background: Periodontal disease has been consistently associated with chronic disease; there are no large studies of breast cancer, although oral-associated microbes are present in breast tumors.

Methods: In the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, a prospective cohort of postmenopausal women, 73,737 women without previous breast cancer were followed. Incident, primary, invasive breast tumors were verified by physician adjudication. Periodontal disease was by self-report. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards, adjusted for breast cancer risk factors. Because the oral microbiome of those with periodontal disease differs...

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Is there an association between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and periodontal inflammation?

This research was originally published in 2016 by N. Nizam, O. K. Basoglu, M. S. Tasbakan, D. F. Lappin & N. Buduneli. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Objectives

The aim of this study is to assess salivary, serum biomarkers, and subgingival bacteria as putative candidates in the potential association between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and periodontal disease.

Materials and methods

Fifty-two patients were grouped according to the severity of OSAS: 13 participants served as controls, 17 patients had mild-to-moderate OSAS, and 22 severe OSAS. Serum, saliva, and subgingival plaque samples were collected, and clinical periodontal parameters were recorded. Salivary, serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α), osteoprotegerin, soluble Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (sRANKL), and apelin were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Bacterial counts...

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Association of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancer tissues with molecular features and prognosis

This research was originally published in 2015 by Kei Mitsuhashi, Katsuhiko Nosho, Yasutaka Sukawa, Yasutaka Matsunaga, Miki Ito, Hiroyoshi Kurihara, Shinichi Kanno, Hisayoshi Igarashi, Takafumi Naito, Yasushi Adachi, Mami Tachibana, Tokuma Tanuma, Hiroyuki Maguchi, Toshiya Shinohara, Tadashi Hasegawa, Masafumi Imamura, Yasutoshi Kimura, Koichi Hirata, Reo Maruyama, Hiromu Suzuki, Kohzoh Imai, Hiroyuki Yamamoto, and Yasuhisa Shinomura. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Recently, bacterial infection causing periodontal disease has attracted considerable attention as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fusobacterium species is an oral bacterial group of the human microbiome. Some evidence suggests that Fusobacterium species promote colorectal cancer development; however, no previous studies have reported the association between Fusobacterium species and pancreatic cancer. Therefore, we examined...

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Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria

This research was originally published in 2015 byJose Manuel Almerich-Silla, Jose María Montiel-Company, Sara Pastor, Felipe Serrano, Miriam Puig-Silla,and Francisco Dasí. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Objective. To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD) were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6...

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Tooth loss is independently associated with poor outcomes in stable coronary heart disease

This research was originally published in 2011 by Dental Health Services Victoria.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

We investigated associations between self-reported tooth loss and cardiovascular outcomes in a global stable coronary heart disease cohort.

We examined 15,456 patients from 39 countries with stable coronary heart disease (prior myocardial infarction, prior revascularisation or multivessel coronary heart disease) in the STABILITY trial. At baseline, patients reported number of teeth (26–32 (all), 20–25, 15–19, 1–14 and no teeth) and were followed for 3.7 years. Cox regression models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic status, determined associations between tooth loss level (26–32 teeth: lowest level; no teeth: highest level) and cardiovascular outcomes.

After adjustment, every increase in tooth loss level was associated with an...

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