Presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in esophagus and its association with the clinicopathological characteristics and survival in patients with esophageal cancer

This research was originally published in 2016 byShegan Gao, Shuoguo Li, Zhikun Ma, Shuo Liang, Tanyou Shan, Mengxi Zhang, Xiaojuan Zhu, Pengfei Zhang, Gang Liu, Fuyou Zhou, Xiang Yuan, Ruinuo Jia, Jan Potempa, David A. Scott, Richard J. Lamont, Huizhi Wang & Xiaoshan Feng. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Background

Mounting evidence suggests a causal relationship between specific bacterial infections and the development of certain malignancies. However, the possible role of the keystone periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains unknown. Therefore, we examined the presence of P. gingivalis in esophageal mucosa, and the relationship between P. gingivalis infection and the diagnosis and prognosis of ESCC.

Methods

The presence of P. gingivalis in the esophageal tissues from ESCC patients and normal controls was examined by...

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Periodontal Disease and Breast Cancer: Prospective Cohort Study of Postmenopausal Women

This research was originally published in 2016 by Jo L. Freudenheim, Robert J. Genco, Michael J. LaMonte, Amy E. Millen, Kathleen M. Hovey, Xiaodan Mai, Ngozi Nwizu, Christopher A. Andrews and Jean Wactawski-Wende. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Background: Periodontal disease has been consistently associated with chronic disease; there are no large studies of breast cancer, although oral-associated microbes are present in breast tumors.

Methods: In the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, a prospective cohort of postmenopausal women, 73,737 women without previous breast cancer were followed. Incident, primary, invasive breast tumors were verified by physician adjudication. Periodontal disease was by self-report. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards, adjusted for breast cancer risk factors. Because the oral microbiome of those with periodontal disease differs...

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Is there an association between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and periodontal inflammation?

This research was originally published in 2016 by N. Nizam, O. K. Basoglu, M. S. Tasbakan, D. F. Lappin & N. Buduneli. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Objectives

The aim of this study is to assess salivary, serum biomarkers, and subgingival bacteria as putative candidates in the potential association between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and periodontal disease.

Materials and methods

Fifty-two patients were grouped according to the severity of OSAS: 13 participants served as controls, 17 patients had mild-to-moderate OSAS, and 22 severe OSAS. Serum, saliva, and subgingival plaque samples were collected, and clinical periodontal parameters were recorded. Salivary, serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α), osteoprotegerin, soluble Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (sRANKL), and apelin were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Bacterial counts...

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Association of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancer tissues with molecular features and prognosis

This research was originally published in 2015 by Kei Mitsuhashi, Katsuhiko Nosho, Yasutaka Sukawa, Yasutaka Matsunaga, Miki Ito, Hiroyoshi Kurihara, Shinichi Kanno, Hisayoshi Igarashi, Takafumi Naito, Yasushi Adachi, Mami Tachibana, Tokuma Tanuma, Hiroyuki Maguchi, Toshiya Shinohara, Tadashi Hasegawa, Masafumi Imamura, Yasutoshi Kimura, Koichi Hirata, Reo Maruyama, Hiromu Suzuki, Kohzoh Imai, Hiroyuki Yamamoto, and Yasuhisa Shinomura. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.


ABSTRACT

Recently, bacterial infection causing periodontal disease has attracted considerable attention as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fusobacterium species is an oral bacterial group of the human microbiome. Some evidence suggests that Fusobacterium species promote colorectal cancer development; however, no previous studies have reported the association between Fusobacterium species and pancreatic cancer. Therefore, we examined...

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Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria

This research was originally published in 2015 byJose Manuel Almerich-Silla, Jose María Montiel-Company, Sara Pastor, Felipe Serrano, Miriam Puig-Silla,and Francisco Dasí. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Objective. To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD) were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6...

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Tooth loss is independently associated with poor outcomes in stable coronary heart disease

This research was originally published in 2011 by Dental Health Services Victoria.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

We investigated associations between self-reported tooth loss and cardiovascular outcomes in a global stable coronary heart disease cohort.

We examined 15,456 patients from 39 countries with stable coronary heart disease (prior myocardial infarction, prior revascularisation or multivessel coronary heart disease) in the STABILITY trial. At baseline, patients reported number of teeth (26–32 (all), 20–25, 15–19, 1–14 and no teeth) and were followed for 3.7 years. Cox regression models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic status, determined associations between tooth loss level (26–32 teeth: lowest level; no teeth: highest level) and cardiovascular outcomes.

After adjustment, every increase in tooth loss level was associated with an...

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Effect of Periodontal Therapy on Arterial Structure and Function Among Aboriginal Australians

This research was originally published in 2014 by Kostas Kapellas, Louise J. Maple-Brown, Lisa M. Jamieson, Loc G. Do, Kerin O’Dea, Alex Brown, Tommy Y. Cai, Nicholas M. Anstey, David R. Sullivan, Hao Wang, David S. Celermajer, Gary D. Slade, and Michael R. Skilton.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment....

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Periodontitis Increases the Risk of a First Myocardial Infarction

Uncategorized Jun 01, 2021

This research was originally published in 2016 by
Lars Rydén, Kåre Buhlin, Eva Ekstrand, Ulf de Faire, Anders Gustafsson, Jacob Holmer, Barbro Kjellström, Bertil Lindahl, Anna Norhammar, Åke Nygren, Per Näsman, Nilminie Rathnayake, Elisabet Svenungsson, and Björn Klinge.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

Abstract

Background—

The relationship between periodontitis (PD) and cardiovascular disease is debated. PD is common in patients with cardiovascular disease. It has been postulated that PD could be causally related to the risk for cardiovascular disease, a hypothesis tested in the Periodontitis and Its Relation to Coronary Artery Disease (PAROKRANK) study.

Methods and Results—

Eight hundred five patients (<75 years of age) with a first myocardial infarction (MI) and 805 age- (mean 62±8), sex- (male 81%), and area-matched controls without MI underwent standardized dental examination...

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Links between oral health and general health the case for action

This research was originally published in 2011 by Dental Health Services Victoria.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Dental decay is the second most costly diet-related disease in Australia, with an economic impact comparable with heart disease and diabetes. Approximately $6.1 billion was spent on dental services in 2007-08, representing 6.2%1 of total health expenditure. Despite this effort, decay and periodontal diseases remain a major health problem. Oral health can no longer be ignored in designing overall national health strategies. It is essential to protect natural teeth from decay and periodontal disease, and focus on early detection and prevention of these conditions. Evidence clearly demonstrates that these diseases are not just limited to the mouth, but importantly are linked to general health overall.

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Correlation Between Periodontal Disease Indices and Lung Cancer in Greek Adults: A Case — Control Study

This research was originally published in 2017 by Nikolaos Andreas Chrysanthakopoulos.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of the present case-control study was to examine the possible associations between periodontal disease indices and the risk of lung cancer development in a sample of Greek out-patients referred to a medical and a dental private practice.

Materials and methods: A total of 200 individuals were interviewed and underwent an oral clinical examination, and 64 of them were suffered from several histological types of lung cancer. The estimation of the possible associations between lung cancer as a dependent variable and periodontal disease indices as independent ones was carried out by using a multiple regression analysis model.

Results: Probing pocket depth (odds ratio (OR) = 2.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-7.06), clinical attachment loss (OR = 3.51, 95% CI 1.30-9.47) bleeding on...

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