Effect of Periodontal Therapy on Arterial Structure and Function Among Aboriginal Australians

This research was originally published in 2014 by Kostas Kapellas, Louise J. Maple-Brown, Lisa M. Jamieson, Loc G. Do, Kerin O’Dea, Alex Brown, Tommy Y. Cai, Nicholas M. Anstey, David R. Sullivan, Hao Wang, David S. Celermajer, Gary D. Slade, and Michael R. Skilton.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment....

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Periodontitis Increases the Risk of a First Myocardial Infarction

Uncategorized Jun 01, 2021

This research was originally published in 2016 by
Lars Rydén, Kåre Buhlin, Eva Ekstrand, Ulf de Faire, Anders Gustafsson, Jacob Holmer, Barbro Kjellström, Bertil Lindahl, Anna Norhammar, Åke Nygren, Per Näsman, Nilminie Rathnayake, Elisabet Svenungsson, and Björn Klinge.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

Abstract

Background—

The relationship between periodontitis (PD) and cardiovascular disease is debated. PD is common in patients with cardiovascular disease. It has been postulated that PD could be causally related to the risk for cardiovascular disease, a hypothesis tested in the Periodontitis and Its Relation to Coronary Artery Disease (PAROKRANK) study.

Methods and Results—

Eight hundred five patients (<75 years of age) with a first myocardial infarction (MI) and 805 age- (mean 62±8), sex- (male 81%), and area-matched controls without MI underwent standardized dental examination...

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Links between oral health and general health the case for action

This research was originally published in 2011 by Dental Health Services Victoria.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Dental decay is the second most costly diet-related disease in Australia, with an economic impact comparable with heart disease and diabetes. Approximately $6.1 billion was spent on dental services in 2007-08, representing 6.2%1 of total health expenditure. Despite this effort, decay and periodontal diseases remain a major health problem. Oral health can no longer be ignored in designing overall national health strategies. It is essential to protect natural teeth from decay and periodontal disease, and focus on early detection and prevention of these conditions. Evidence clearly demonstrates that these diseases are not just limited to the mouth, but importantly are linked to general health overall.

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Correlation Between Periodontal Disease Indices and Lung Cancer in Greek Adults: A Case — Control Study

This research was originally published in 2017 by Nikolaos Andreas Chrysanthakopoulos.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of the present case-control study was to examine the possible associations between periodontal disease indices and the risk of lung cancer development in a sample of Greek out-patients referred to a medical and a dental private practice.

Materials and methods: A total of 200 individuals were interviewed and underwent an oral clinical examination, and 64 of them were suffered from several histological types of lung cancer. The estimation of the possible associations between lung cancer as a dependent variable and periodontal disease indices as independent ones was carried out by using a multiple regression analysis model.

Results: Probing pocket depth (odds ratio (OR) = 2.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-7.06), clinical attachment loss (OR = 3.51, 95% CI 1.30-9.47) bleeding on...

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The American Journal of Cardiology and Journal of Periodontology Editors’ Consensus: Periodontitis and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

This research was originally published in 2009 by Vincent E. Friedewald, Kenneth S. Kornman, James D. Beck, Robert Genco, Allison Goldfine,k Peter Libby, Steven Offenbacher, Paul M. Ridker, Thomas E. Van Dyke, and William C. Roberts.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Acknowledgment: This Editors' Consensus is supported by an educational grant from Colgate-Palmolive, Inc., New York, New York, and is based on a meeting of the authors held in Boston, Massachusetts, on January 9, 2009.

Disclosure: Dr. Friedewald has received honoraria for speaking from Novartis, East Hanover, New Jersey. Dr. Kornman is a full-time employee and shareholder of Interleukin Genetics, Waltham, Massachusetts, which owns patents on genetic biomarkers for chronic inflammatory diseases. Dr. Genco is a consultant to Merck, Whitehouse Station, New Jersey. Dr. Ridker has received research support from AstraZeneca, Wilmington, Delaware; Novartis; Pfizer,...

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Usefulness of Self-Reported Periodontal Disease to Identify Individuals with Elevated Inflammatory Markers at Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

This research was originally published in 2008 by Heidi Mochari, MPH, RD, John T. Grbic, DMD, M Med Sc, Lori Mosca, MD, MPH, PhD.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Periodontal disease has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and inflammation may represent a common pathophysiology. Oral health screening in the context of CVD risk assessment represents a potential opportunity to identify persons at risk for CVD. The purpose of this study was to determine if self-reported oral health status is independently associated with inflammatory markers and if oral health assessment as part of CVD risk screening can identify at-risk persons without traditional CVD risk factors. A baseline analysis was conducted among participants in the NHLBI Family Intervention Trial for Heart Health (F.I.T. Heart) (n=421; mean age 48±13.5y; 36% nonwhite) without CVD or diabetes who underwent standardized assessment of oral health,...

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Clinical Periodontal and Microbiologic Parameters in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

This research was originally published in 2009 by Jamal M. Stein, Bernhard Kuch, Georg Conrads, Stefan Fickl, Jaroslaw Chrobot, Susanne Schulz, Christina Ocklenburg and Ralf Smeets.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

 

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of clinical periodontal parameters and the presence of periodontal pathogens in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

Methods: A total of 104 subjects (54 patients with AMI and 50 healthy controls) were included. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for periodontal pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa; previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf; previously T. forsythensis), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) using dot-blot hybridization.

Results: Patients with AMI had a significantly higher frequency of probing depths (PDs) >or=4 mm than...

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Invasion of Aortic and Heart Endothelial Cells by Porphyromonas gingivalis

This research was originally published in 1998 by Rajashri G. Despande, Mahfuz B. Khan and Caroline Attardo Genco.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Invasion of host cells is believed to be an important strategy utilized by a number of pathogens, which affords them protection from the host immune system. The connective tissues of the periodontium are extremely well vascularized, which allows invading microorganisms, such as the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, to readily enter the bloodstream. However, the ability of P. gingivalis to actively invade endothelial cells has not been previously examined. In this study, we demonstrate that P. gingivalis can invade bovine and human endothelial cells as assessed by an antibiotic protection assay and by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. P. gingivalis A7436 was demonstrated to adhere to and to invade fetal bovine heart endothelial cells (FBHEC), bovine...

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Detection of Periodontal Bacteria in Atheromatous Plaques by Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

This research was originally published in 2011 by Elena Figuero , María Sánchez-Beltrán, Susana Cuesta-Frechoso, Jose María Tejerina, Jose Antonio del Castro, Jose María Gutiérrez, David Herrera, Mariano Sanz.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Background. In recent years, increasing evidence regarding the potential association between periodontal diseases and cardiovascular diseases has been elicited. The available evidence underlines the importance of detecting periodontal pathogens on atheromatous plaques as the first step in demonstrating the causal relationship between both entities. It is the main aim of this investigation to detect periodontitis-associated bacteria from carotid artery atheromatous plaques recovered from patients who received an endarterectomy, using strict sample procurement and laboratory procedures.

Methods. Atheromatous plaques from endarterectomies from carotid...

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Bacterial Signatures in Thrombus Aspirates of Patients with Myocardial Infarction

This research was originally published in 2013 by Tanja Pessi, Vesa Karhunen, Pasi P. Karjalainen, Antti Ylitalo, Juhani K. Airaksinen, Matti Niemi, Mikko Pietila, Kari Lounatmaa, Teppo Haapaniemi, Terho Lehtimäki, Reijo Laaksonen, Pekka J. Karhunen and Jussi Mikkelsson.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Background—Infectious agents, especially bacteria and their components originating from the oral cavity or respiratory tract have been suggested to contribute to inflammation in the coronary plaque, leading to rupture and the subsequent development of coronary thrombus. We aimed to measure bacterial DNA in thrombus aspirates of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (MI) and to check for possible association between bacteria findings and oral pathology in the same cohort.

Methods and Results—Thrombus aspirates and arterial blood from patients with ST-elevation MI undergoing primary percutaneous...

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