Certain oral microbiota linked to pancreatic cancer, study finds

This research was originally published in 2019 by Cheryl Xia.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

A large case-controlled study shows the association between human oral microbiota and pancreatic cancer risk.

Pancreatic cancer is the 12th most commonly occurring cancer worldwide and the 7th leading cause of cancer-related death. Due to its high lethality, the five-year survival rate is estimated to be 24% at early diagnosis and 1.8% by advanced-stage diagnosis. Prevention strategies for pancreatic cancer are imperative, however, the etiology of this disease is poorly understood. Cigarette smoking is one of the few established risk factors that has been linked to cancer development. Other modifiable exposures include obesity, diabetes, and chronic pancreatitis that are often seen in pancreatic cancer patients. Of interest, recent research has associated periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, with increased pancreatic...

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Does periodontal disease drive pancreatic cancer?

This research was originally published in 2019 by Ana Sandoiu. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Is it possible that prevention of periodontal disease might be key to the prevention of pancreatic cancer? While intervention studies on humans to prove that theory have yet to be conducted, there is robust data that seems to implicate specific periodontal pathogens raising the risk for, and most likely contributing to, the development of pancreatic cancer. This is something dental professionals need to know—read more here.


If this question intrigues you, keep reading. It is a topic I keep stumbling across in my quest for current data on oral-systemic connections. It is also personal, as my husband is a 10-year pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer survivor. A recent article I read was compelling enough that I thought, “Wow! Clinicians really need to understand this.” Check out the title: “Periodontal pathogens...

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Candida infection can reach brain and impair memory

This research was originally published in 2019 by Ana Sandoiu.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

A new study in mice reveals that Candida albicans — a fungus largely perceived as harmless — can cause memory problems and brain abnormalities that resemble those characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease.

Candida albicansis a species of fungus that grows naturally in the human gut, mouth, and vagina.

Although the yeast is mostly harmless, it can develop into issues ranging from thrush to more serious infections that reach the blood and other organs.

C. albicans is the most common cause of fungal infections in humans, as well as the most extensively studied fungal pathogen that affects people.

new studyTrusted Source, which appears in the journal Nature Communications, adds to the existing body of knowledge about C. albicans.

The new research shows that the fungus can enter the...

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Poor Oral Health and Blood Pressure Control Among US Hypertensive Adults

This research was originally published in 2018 by Davide Pietropaoli, Rita Del Pinto, Claudio Ferri, Jackson T. WrightJr, Mario Giannoni, Eleonora Ortu, and Annalisa Monaco. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the tissues surrounding the teeth, with evidence of systemic effects. Some studies showed the benefit of periodontal therapy on blood pressure (BP), but the impact of periodontitis on BP control is unknown. We retrospectively analyzed cross-sectional, nationally representative data from treated hypertensive adults aged ≥30 years with and without periodontitis. BP was examined as both continuous (mm Hg) and categorical (treatment goal achievement status according to guidelines: at goal and above goal) variable according to the presence or absence of periodontitis and its clinical parameters (probing depth, clinical attachment loss, and disease severity...

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Chronic oral application of a periodontal pathogen results in brain inflammation, neurodegeneration and amyloid beta production in wild type mice

This research was originally published in 2018 by Vladimir Ilievski,Paulina K. Zuchowska,Stefan J. Green,Peter T. Toth,Michael E. Ragozzino,Khuong Le,Haider W. Aljewari,Neil M. O’Brien-Simpson,Eric C. Reynolds,Keiko Watanabe. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

The results from cross sectional and longitudinal studies show that periodontitis is closely associated with cognitive impairment (CI) and Alzhemer’s Disease (AD). Further, studies using animal model of periodontitis and human post-mortem brain tissues from subjects with AD strongly suggest that a gram-negative periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and/or its product gingipain is/are translocated to the brain. However, neuropathology resulting from Pg oral application is not known. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that repeated exposure of wild type C57BL/6 mice to orally administered Pg results in neuroinflammation,...

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Microflora of Endodontic Infection - A Review

This research was originally published in 2018 by Shruthi H Attavar, Mithra N Hegde. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

The aim of endodontic treatment is to identify and eradicate the etiological factor responsible for infection. Thorough Cleaning of the root canalsystem by instrumentation, irrigation and removal of endodontic biofilm is considered as most important factor to prevent and treat the disease. The apical delta, apical fins, isthmuses present in the root canal provide an excellent environment for formation of biofilm and is one of the main cause for reinfection. The following review article explores the role the Endodontic microflora and its role in the success of endodontic therapy .

Read full article here

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Impact of Endodontically Treated Teeth on Systemic Diseases

This research was originally published in 2019 by Johann Lechner and Volker von Baehr. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT
Background: This study compares the radiographic distribution of apical periodontitis (AP) in rootfilled and endodontically treated teeth among healthy controls and patients with systemic diseases; the incidence of AP was almost twice as high in the latter group.

Objective: The question arises as to whether the biogenic amines (mercaptan/thioether/hydrogen sulfide) originating from endodontically treated teeth have systemic, subtoxic and immunological effects.

Method: In order to determine this, local hydrogen sulfide measurements of endodontically treated teeth were combined with the laboratory serum analyses of modified proteins to assess the relationship of these compounds with type IV immune reactions.

Results: It was found that 42.5% of the group with systemic diseases showed immunological disturbance as...

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Comparison of Endotoxin Levels Found in Primary and Secondary Endodontic Infections

This research was originally published in 2019 by Brenda P.F.A. Gomes, DDS, MSc, PhD, Marcos S. Endo, DDS, MSc, and Frederico C. Martinho, DDS, MSc, PhD.

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This clinical study was conducted to compare the levels of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides [LPSs]) found in primary and secondary endodontic infections with apical periodontitis by correlating LPS contents with clinical/radiographic findings. In addition, the presence of target gram-negative anaerobic bacteria was also investigated.

Methods: Samples were taken from 15 root canals with primary infections and 15 with secondary infections by using paper points. The limulus amebocyte lysate assay was used to quantify endotoxins, and the polymerase chain reaction technique (16S rDNA) was used for bacterial investigation.

Results: Endotoxins were detected in 100% of the root canal samples collected from primary (15/15) and secondary (15/15)...

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We may finally know what causes Alzheimer’s – and how to stop it

This research was originally published in 2019 by Debora Mackenzie. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

AFTER decades of disappointment, we may have a new lead on fighting Alzheimer’s disease. Compelling evidence that the condition is caused by a bacterium involved in gum disease could prove a game-changer in tackling one of medicine’s biggest mysteries, and lead to effective treatments or even a vaccine.

As populations have aged, dementia has skyrocketed to become the fifth biggest cause of death worldwide. Alzheimer’s constitutes some 70 per cent of these cases (see “What is Alzheimer’s disease”), yet we don’t know what causes it. The condition, which results in progressive loss of memory and cognitive function, usually over a decade or so, is devastating both to those who have it and to their loved ones.

The condition often involves the accumulation of two types of proteins –...

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Alzheimer’s disease - a neurospirochetosis. Analysis of the evidence following Koch’s and Hill’s criteria.

This research was originally published in 2011 by Judith Miklossy. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

It is established that chronic spirochetal infection can cause slowly progressive dementia, brain atrophy and amyloid deposition in late neurosyphilis. Recently it has been suggested that various types of spirochetes, in an analogous way to Treponema pallidum, could cause dementia and may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we review all data available in the literature on the detection of spirochetes in AD and critically analyze the association and causal relationship between spirochetes and AD following established criteria of Koch and Hill. The results show a statistically significant association between spirochetes and AD (P = 1.5 × 10-17, OR = 20, 95% CI = 8-60, N = 247). When neutral techniques recognizing all types of spirochetes were used, or the highly prevalent periodontal...

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