Ignoring Dental Health Can Increase Diabetes Risk: These Dangerous Diseases Can Be Caused by Poor Oral Hygiene

This research was originally published in 2018 by Sandhya Raghavan. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Keeping your teeth clean is no longer just an oral hygiene is no longer just an oral hygiene issue. Not brushing correctly or ignoring your teeth can increase your risk of diabetes, according to a new study Dr. Raynald Samoa from the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California revealed that the researchers found a positive connection between poor glucose tolerance and missing teeth

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Studies link gum disease with pancreatic cancer

This research was originally published in 2018. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

The bacteria that cause periodontitis may also play a part in the onset of pancreatic cancer, according to new research coming out of Scandinavia.

Researchers at the University of Helsinki and the Helsinki University Hospital, Finland, and the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden have been investigating the role of bacteria causing periodontitis in the development of oral and certain other cancers, as well as the link between periodontitis and cancer mortality on the population level.

Their latest study, published last month in the British Journal of Cancer, has for the first time proved the existence of a mechanism on the molecular level through which the bacteria associated with periodontitis, Treponema denticola (Td), may also have an effect on the onset of cancer.



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Advanced gum disease increases risk for lung, colorectal cancer

This research was originally published in 2018 by Dominique S. Michaud and Elizabeth A. Platz. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Individuals with severe periodontitis, or gum disease, had increased risk for developing cancer compared with individuals with mild or no gum disease, according to published findings.

Those with severe periodontitis had more than double the risk for developing lung cancer and twofold higher risk for colorectal cancer, the research showed.

Periodontal disease can cause bacteremia, endotoxemia and systemic low-grade inflammation. There is accumulating evidence that these conditions are contributing to chronic diseases, including heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer,” Dominique S. Michaud, ScD, professor of public health and community medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine, told HemOnc Today. “The question of...

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Managing Atherosclerotic Disease: Medical and Dental Collaboration- The New Standard of Care

This research was originally published in 2018 by John Kempton DDS. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Medicine and dentistry have long been aware of the connection, association, and direct links between high-risk periodontal pathogens and cardiovascular disease. Knowledge alone has a limited potential to change chronic disease outcomes unless it leads to new clinical practices. Effective and proven new protocols to identify and mitigate virulent periodontal microbes are available today. A small percentage of dentists have implemented these practices and the majority of physicians are unaware of their existence. In the end, one of the significant causes or perpetuators of atherosclerotic vascular disease is left undiagnosed and under treated.

Periodontitis is a polymicrobial, systemic, infectious, and inflammatory disease with genetic expressions. When medical colleagues are faced with an infectious disease, their effective...

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Gum infections tied to increased risk of stomach cancer precursor

This research was originally published in 2017 by Lisa Rapaport. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

(Reuters Health) - Gum infections may increase people’s risk for sores in the digestive tract that can lead to stomach cancer, a small study suggests.

Researchers focused on what’s known as periodontal disease, serious infections in the mouth caused by bacteria in dental plaque. Daily brushing and flossing can prevent gingivitis, the milder form of periodontal disease, but untreated cases can lead to permanent damage to the gums and bone.

The new study involved 35 people with so-called precancerous lesions: abnormal cells or sores in the digestive tract where cancer is more likely to occur compared to normal tissue. The researchers also studied a control group of 70 similar people who didn’t have these lesions.

Overall, 32 percent of people with precancerous gastric lesions had the kind of bleeding during dental...

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A MYSTERIOUS BACTERIUM MAY BE A CRITICAL PART OF CANCER : COULD WE TREAT SOME CANCERS WITH A SIMPLE ANTIBIOTIC?

This research was originally published in 2017 by DOM GALEON. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

The Case of the Traveling Bacteria

In 2011, two researchers stumbled upon an intriguing find. In separate studies, Dr. Matthew Meyerson from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Dr. Robert A. Holt from the Simon Fraser University in British Columbia found bacteria that’s normally in the mouth, called Fusobacteria, in human colon cancers.

Six years later, in a new study published in the journal Science, Meyerson and colleagues have confirmed the presence of Fusobacteria in up to half of all colon tumors. The researchers extensively studied human colon tumors that have metastasized to the liver. They found that tumors that have been infected with Fusobacteria continued to be so, even in the liver.

On the other hand, those cancer cells that originally didn’t have the bacteria remained...

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Research may explain why gum disease is linked to heart problems

This research was originally published in 2017. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol. 

ABSTRACT

Heart disease and fatty clogs in the arteries go hand in hand. But new evidence suggests the fatty molecules might come not only from what you eat, but from the bacteria in your mouth, report UConn scientists in the 16 August issue of the Journal of Lipid Research. The research may explain why gum disease is associated with heart trouble.

Heart attacks and strokes are the crises we notice, but they result from a slow process of atherosclerosis, the hardening and clogging of the arteries with fatty substances called lipids. Immune cells stick to the walls of blood vessels, scavenge lipids, and multiply. The blood vessel walls inflame and thicken as the smooth muscle cells lining them change, swelling and dividing to create plaques, clogs, and warty growths called atheromas.

For a very long time, doctors and researchers assumed that the...

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Mouth bacteria linked to esophageal cancer

This research was originally published in 2017 by Catharine Paddock, Ph.D. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

An analysis of microbes sampled from the mouths of more than 120,000 people has found that two types of bacteria that lead to gum disease are also linked to higher risk of esophageal cancer.

The study — led by NYU Langone Health’s Perlmutter Cancer Center in New York, NY — also reveals that some types of mouth bacteria are linked to lower risk of esophageal cancer.

Reporting in the journal Cancer Research, the researchers note that they ruled out potential effects from smoking, alcohol, and body mass index (BMI) when they analyzed the data.

Senior investigator of the study Jiyoung Ahn, an associate professor and epidemiologist at NYU School of Medicine, believes that the findings will take us closer to establishing the causes of esophageal cancer.

She says that this is...

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Periodontal disease and atherosclerosis: Strengthening the oral-systemic link

This research was originally published in 2017 by Richard H. Nagelberg, DDS. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

A RECENTLY PUBLISHED STUDY IN THE MEDICAL JOURNAL, Anaerobe, investigated the link between the presence of eight periodontal pathogens and their virulence genes to atheromatous plaques in patients with ischemic heart disease. (1)Many studies have looked at this link; however, the previous studies were commonly limited to the mere presence of oral bacteria.

This study looked at the bacteria and the bacterial genetic coding for virulence factors. The significance of inclusion of the virulence genes in this study is that it adds an additional level of credibility to the conclusions and insight into the mechanisms involved in the association between the bacteria and atheromatous plaques.

Subgingival and atheromatous plaque samples were obtained from 65 ischemic heart disease patients. The samples that were...

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History of Periodontitis Diagnosis and Edentulism as Predictors of Cardiovascular Disease, Stroke, and Mortality in Postmenopausal Women

This research was originally published in 2017 by Michael J. LaMonte, Robert J. Genco, Kathleen M. Hovey, Robert B. Wallace, Jo L. Freudenheim, Dominique S. Michaud, Xiaodan Mai, Lesley F. Tinker, Christian R. Salazar, Christopher A. Andrews, Wenjun Li, Charles B. Eaton, Lisa W. Martin, and Jean Wactawski‐Wende. 

We have curated this article as a reference point for The Larkin Protocol.

ABSTRACT

Background

Few studies have reported associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in older women, which is the objective of the present investigation.

Methods and Results

Participants were 57 001 postmenopausal women ages 55 to 89 years (mean 68 years; >85% 60 and older) who were enrolled (1993–1998) in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, and were without known CVD when history of periodontitis and edentulism was assessed by questionnaire at study Year‐5 (1998–2003). There were 3589...

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